Monday, April 22, 2019
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North Korea says it tested new missile, wants Pompeo out of talks

North Korea says it tested new missile, wants Pompeo out of talks

Reaction and analysis from U.S. ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell on 'The Story.' FOX News operates the FOX News Channel (FNC), FOX Business Network (FBN), FOX News Radio, FOX News Headlines 24/7, FOXNews.com and the direct-to-consumer streaming service, FOX Nation.…
Trump considers releasing migrants into sanctuary cities

Trump considers releasing migrants into sanctuary cities

The president confirmed the plan was created in retribution towards Democrats, though the White House denies putting any pressure on DHS or ICE to place illegal immigrants only in sanctuary cities; John Roberts reports. #DailyBriefing #FoxNews FOX News operates the…
Watch police drag Assange out of Ecuadorian Embassy in handcuffs

Watch police drag Assange out of Ecuadorian Embassy in handcuffs

British police are seen dragging the white-bearded WikiLeaks founder out of the Ecuadorian Embassy in London in a dramatic video after Ecuador withdraws his asylum; Greg Palkot reports. #FoxandFriends FOX News operates the FOX News Channel (FNC), FOX Business Network…
Judge blocks latest hardline Trump immigration policy

Judge blocks latest hardline Trump immigration policy

In the latest of a long series of setbacks as President Trump attempts to enact tighter immigration restrictions, a federal judge rules against forcing asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico; William La Jeunesse reports on the details. #FoxNews FOX News operates…
Trump is removing his US Secret Service director

Trump is removing his US Secret Service director

Randolph Alles was reportedly told to have an exit plan in place as part of a leadership transition at the Department of Homeland Security. #Outnumbered #FoxNews FOX News operates the FOX News Channel (FNC), FOX Business Network (FBN), FOX News…

Gray leap forward: Xi Jinping shows natural hair color in a rare move for...

Defying decades of political tradition, China's most powerful man is going gray. Silver streaks in President Xi Jinping's hair spotted at the annual national legislative session, which began March 5, have captured attention and stirred speculation among China watchers as to what the radical change might mean. In official portraits and in public, top Chinese leaders -- who are usually in their 60s or older -- have long sported impeccable jet-black hair. But the trend has become more pronounced since the 1990s. "Xi Jinping wants to debunk this tradition to make himself look more like an ordinary Chinese citizen, a man of the people." A softened image This populist image has been carefully cultivated by the Chinese leader since he came to power in late 2012. "(Not dyeing his hair) could be a strategy to diminish criticism that he's building a Mao-style personality cult," said Lam. Political signals Observers can already count a growing number of senior officials showing their natural hair color in public. And if past leaders dyed their hair black to illustrate their health and vigor, 65-year-old Xi doesn't seem to have such a need, as one of the youngest Chinese heads of state in recent years. When officials ditched their Mao suits in favor of Western-style suits in the 1980s, it was an unequivocal message about the country's opening to the outside world.

Just one in every 10 politicians in Japan’s lower house is a woman

In Japan's House of Councilors, or upper house, 50 of the 241 representatives -- 20% -- are women. Rwanda topped the IPU list, with women representing 61% of lower house seats. France ranked 16th with 39.7% and the United States was 78th with 23.5%. Facing an aging population, the government has tried to close the gender gap in the workforce with a policy dubbed "womenomics." Last year, a law was passed encouraging political parties to set targets for gender parity. However, there are no incentives or penalties for parties which fail to do so. In the same year, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe appointed just one woman to his new cabinet -- by claiming she had the "presence of two or three women," according to local reports. But they only made up 10.1% of prefectural assemblies and 9.9% of town and village assemblies, according to data from the Gender Equality Bureau Cabinet Office. "Female politicians in Japan must battle against the commonplace view that politics belongs to men," said Fujie Masahiro, a section leader at the Gender Equality Bureau Cabinet Office. "They also face barriers when it comes to juggling family and political life."

On Politics: Trade Deficit Hits Record $891 Billion

Good Thursday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today. _____________________ • One of President Trump’s goals was to narrow the country’s trade deficit. • Mr. Trump’s lead lawyer, Rudolph Giuliani, said that lawyers for several people facing scrutiny in the investigations into the Trump campaign and presidency had contacted him to see whether the president would pardon their clients. • Rusty after years in the minority, House Democrats have stomped on their own messages, fallen prey to Republican maneuvers and now are in open battle over an anti-Israel comment from a freshman representative from Minnesota, Ilhan Omar. • House Democratic leaders have put off a vote on a resolution condemning anti-Semitism and bigotry after a backlash from rank-and-file lawmakers who said Ms. Omar was being unfairly singled out. • Senator Martha McSally, Republican of Arizona and the first woman in the Air Force to fly in combat, said that she was raped by a superior officer while serving, an experience that almost led her to quit the military. • The Justice Department is forming a task force to root out abuse of foreign lobbying restrictions, which prosecutors — most notably the special counsel — have targeted with renewed vigor in recent years. • The Trump administration formally ended rules requiring the government to annually make public its estimates of civilian bystanders killed in airstrikes outside conventional war zones. • Trade talks between the United States and the European Union are off to a rocky start, with the two sides clashing over what should be on the table in the first place.

Britain urged to reject ‘backward’ US food safety standards

The US should join the back of a queue for a post-Brexit trade deal if it thinks its “woefully inadequate” and “backward” animal welfare and food safety standards will be accepted in Britain, the former farming minister George Eustice has said. Eustice, a leading Brexit supporter who resigned from the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs last week, said signing any deal that allowed a reduction in food standards would be a mistake, as it could “give free trade a bad name”. The issue is a contentious one within the UK government as Michael Gove, the environment secretary, has insisted food and welfare standards will be maintained, but Liam Fox, the trade secretary, has defended the safety of chlorine-washed chicken. “Their livestock sectors often suffer from poor husbandry which leads to more prevalence of disease and a greater reliance on the use of antibiotics,” he said. “Whereas we have a ‘farm to fork’ approach to managing disease and contamination risk throughout the supply chain through good husbandry, the culture in the US is more inclined to simply treat contamination of their meat at the end with a chlorine or similar wash.” He said the situation in relation to animal welfare was even worse, as “legislation as regards animal welfare is woefully deficient”. Food fight: doubts grow over post-Brexit standards Read more “There are some regulations governing slaughterhouses but they are not as comprehensive as ours,” he said. “If the Americans want to be granted privileged access to the UK market, then they will have to learn to abide by British law and British standards, or they can kiss goodbye to any trade deal and join the back of the queue,” he said. Johnson, who has been ambassador since 2017, set out the US position on a post-Brexit trade deal in the Telegraph last week, saying it was a myth that chlorine-washed chicken and hormone-pumped beef were bad. “You have been presented with a false choice,” he wrote. Inflammatory and misleading terms like ‘chlorinated chicken’ and ‘hormone beef’ are deployed to cast American farming in the worst possible light.” Johnson described using chlorine to wash chicken as a “public safety no-brainer” and insisted it was the most effective and economical way of dealing with “potentially lethal” bacteria.

Obama tells Winnipeg audience that politics being driven by passions not facts

“I think the danger that we have sometimes now in our politics in the United States, and what I’m seeing internationally, is us being driven by passions, and (we) are disconnected from facts, that in fact deliberately are shielded from facts and reason and logic,” Obama said in Winnipeg on Monday evening. “And what is supported is a story of us being right and them being wrong.” The former president spoke to a sold-out crowd of 13,500 at the Bell MTS Centre during the first Canadian stop of the “Conversation with President Barack Obama” tour on Monday evening. Obama reflected on entering office during the global economic crisis of 2007-08 and said he had great confidence that if the government made smart decisions — relying on facts, reason, logic, evidence and science — the country could largely recover. While never mentioning current U.S. President Donald Trump, Obama said he’s worried about the response to a similar situation today. Most recently the president has faced backlash over declaring a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border. Over about an hour, Obama answered questions from Michael Burns, CEO of the Princess Margaret Cancer Foundation, about topics as varied as his childhood, racism, his time in office and his relationship with former Vice President Joe Biden. He spoke about his wife, Michelle Obama, and her best-selling book, as well as his daughters, and weeping often as he becomes an “empty-nester.” “One of the things that Michelle and I are proudest of during our presidency is we raised women who are kind and thoughtful and aware.” Obama said speaking with young people and seeing the change they are pushing for gives him hope in his post-presidency work. He said he hopes to connect his foundation with that generation so it will become a “university for social change” as he enters the third act of his life. Obama also spoke about Justin Trudeau and former prime minister Stephen Harper. “Americans come up here when they get too frustrated with stuff,” Obama said to generous applause.