Thursday, June 27, 2019
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Boedeker, Jones talk politics in election

We need to focus on growing middle-class jobs in Cleburne that people will be willing to relocate and plug into our community for. We have to focus on job growth to make sustained retail investment possible. Q: What is the most pressing issue facing Cleburne and how would you address it if elected? We have to decide what we want our City to look like 10, 25, and 50 years from today, and then we have to start building toward it. I understand it was purchased to be used as the new police department until further research proved it would be too costly to renovate for that purpose. This would cost less than a new building, provide our police department with larger facilities, and save time. TXDOT projects take a good amount of time to hash out and complete. Q: What is the most pressing issue facing Cleburne and how would you address it if elected? If the efforts of our new staff in these departments were communicated, I believe it would alleviate this negativity and open the door for our community to weigh in on these issues in a constructive manner. The key to Cleburne’s growth and well being is a constructive connection between the city, council, and the community.

On Politics With Lisa Lerer: How Joe Biden’s Touching Resonated With Readers

Welcome to On Politics, your guide to the day in national politics. This week, hundreds of readers shared their reactions to the unfolding accusations against Joe Biden by women who said he had kissed or touched them in ways that made them uncomfortable. Many readers defended the former vice president as a product of a different time and questioned if the #MeToo movement had gone too far. Others insisted that making a woman feel uncomfortable has always been wrong. Here is a selection of our readers’ responses, which came from emails sent by On Politics readers, as well as comments across our site. Now I understand in this MeToo movement that there are those who are uncomfortable with such intimate physical expressions. So now that Joe has been called out on it, it is up to him to show his changed behavior if indeed he runs for president, which I hope he does. Early on we baby boomers rejected the stiff formalities of an earlier generation for an easy physicality, an appreciative give-and-take across gender lines that graced daily life with moments of lightness and warmth. When men kiss me on the head or squeeze my shoulders, it does make me uncomfortable. Check out this chart by the Center for Responsive Politics, which compares these numbers to the first quarter fund-raising in 2008, the last time both parties faced such an open race.

On Politics: Trump Backs Off Health Care Fight

Good Wednesday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today. _____________________ • President Trump backed off plans to introduce a Republican replacement for the Affordable Care Act after Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, warned him that the Senate would not revisit health care before the election. The about-face all but ensured that health care would take a central place in the 2020 campaign, elevating an issue that Democrats consider one of their strengths. • Two more women told The Times that Joseph R. Biden Jr. touched them in ways that made them uncomfortable, more evidence that the former vice president’s style of politicking is proving to be a liability in the #MeToo era. • Despite calls for the resignations of Virginia’s governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general over scandals involving blackface and sexual harassment, they are all still in office — and the state is trying to muddle on. The president’s economic team said it was looking for ways to limit the damage from such a move. • Mr. Trump has vowed to cut aid to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador over migration. He was reacting after the Senate blocked billions of dollars in disaster aid for Midwestern states, in part because Democrats said a proposed $600 million in nutritional assistance to Puerto Rico fell short of its needs. • Jens Stoltenberg, the NATO secretary general, sat very stiffly next to Mr. Trump on Tuesday, two days before the 70th anniversary of the alliance, as the president criticized German military spending and predicted the United States would get along with Russia.

On Politics: Trump’s History With Deutsche Bank

Good Tuesday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today. _____________________ • For nearly two decades, President Trump relied on Deutsche Bank to lend to him when others wouldn’t. The bank, eager to expand in the United States, lent him $2 billion over the years — and once he was elected president, employees were told not to utter his name. Here’s what The Times found in an investigation, and here are four takeaways from our reporting. But as House Democrats sit down to draft their vision of health care policy, lawmakers find themselves badly divided on an issue that helped deliver their majority. • Beto O’Rourke raised more than $6 million online in the first 24 hours after announcing his presidential campaign last week, outpacing his rivals for the Democratic nomination and making an emphatic statement about his grass-roots financial strength. • Democratic candidates for president are importing grass-roots activism into their campaign by bringing a new generation of staff members into the fold who are more diverse and issue-driven than in years past. • A long-running federal investigation into a White House counsel in the Obama administration is reaching a critical stage, presenting the Justice Department with a decision about whether to charge a prominent Democrat as part of a more aggressive crackdown on illegal foreign lobbying. to open investigations into the activities of a Chinese-American woman suspected of trying to sell access to Mr. Trump.

Amy Klobuchar tried to torpedo staff’s future job prospects: report

Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., is facing yet more reports that she mistreated staff working in her Senate office, including claims that she attempted to torpedo departing employee’s future job opportunities -- an allegation the senator denies. Klobuchar’s office denied the claims, telling the outlet: “This is completely false. The senator has never criticized her staff to prospective employees.” In one example, HuffPost reported that Klobuchar confronted a fellow Democrat and told them she wanted the offer rescinded. Former staffers told the outlet that fear of her attempting to kill off a job offer was so well known that the culture in the office was to treat a job offer “like a state secret.” Klobuchar has been hit by a flood of allegations in outlets such as The Times, HuffPost and Buzzfeed, including that her conduct became so well known that the Senate minority leader at that time, Harry Reid, D-Nev., told her to change her behavior. When asked about the report that she threw a binder, she did not flat-out deny it. "I don't know, it's all anonymous. I will say that I'm proud of our staff," Klobuchar told Fox News last week. "And yes, I can be a tough boss, and push people -- that's obvious. But that's because I have high expectations of myself, I have high expectations of those who work for me, and I have a high expectation for our country. My chief of staff has worked for me for six years, my state director for seven years, my campaign manager for 14 years."

On Politics: The Biggest Stories of the Week

From the Russia probe to the national emergency, it’s been a busy week in American politics. On Tuesday, The Times published an examination of President Trump’s actions that found the president had actively tried to undermine multiple investigations surrounding his administration. The rules governing the special counsel give Mr. Barr considerable flexibility in deciding how much information from the report he provides to Congress and the public. Democratic lawmakers want to ensure that every detail is shared. But Mr. Trump’s plan to build his border wall involves more than his invocation of emergency powers to redirect military construction funds. Additional Reading • Trump Claims His Wall Is Being Built. Senator Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent and 2016 Democratic primary runner-up whose populist agenda has helped push the party to the left, announced on Tuesday that he was running again. In recent weeks, some Democratic candidates, including Senators Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris, have embraced race-conscious proposals that even the most left-wing elected officials once shied away from — like reparations for slavery. Additional Reading • Bernie Sanders Stumbled With Black Voters in 2016. • How Amy Klobuchar Treats Her Staff • Menendez and Booker, From Newark and the Senate to a Corruption Trial and 2020 Here’s what else happened this week: • Officials in North Carolina ordered a new election for the House race in the Ninth Congressional District after Mark Harris, the Republican whose apparent win is under investigation for voter fraud, called for a new vote himself.

The Times’ unicorn and lion tame political animals in Westminster Zoo ad

The Times and The Sunday Times has launched a new campaign that portrays politicians as animals in 'Westminster Zoo' as the publisher tries to reinforce its commitment to keeping readers informed in confusing times. Tamed' campaign anthropomorphizes politicians as animals in a similar vein to Orwell's Animal Farm. Designed by News UK's in-house agency, Pulse Creative, the ad sees squawking parrots, hysterical hyenas, slippery snakes and every-changing chameleons adorn the green benches of the House of Commons. Reiterating how it is newspaper's jobs to 'tame politics,' only the lion and the unicorn - from the crest in The Times masthead - can bring order to the proceedings. Then a 20-second ad launched across social media platforms, using the promoted hashtag #PoliticsTamed. John Witherow, editor of The Times, said: “As Britain’s most trusted national newspaper, The Times consistently provides quality journalism and incisive commentary from across the political spectrum. Our campaign captures the national mood of confusion and frustration, while we at The Times seek to bring clarity and balance to our reporting of this pivotal moment in British politics.” Catherine Newman, chief marketing officer at the publisher added: “Right now there is so much information from so many sources it's hard to make sense of it all. campaign aims to address this. "The Times has been making sense of politics since 1785, so when people don't know where to turn, we want to remind them that The Times and The Sunday Times offer the guidance and analysis they need. by Pulse Creative Added 1 day ago Agency: Pulse Creative Overall Rating 5/5 Vote

Former employee in Perkins shirt led effort to disrupt trash pickup, Shreveport mayor says

Breaking News Alert (Henrietta Wildsmith/The Times) A disgruntled former city employee wearing a shirt with a mayoral candidate's name told Shreveport sanitation workers to call in sick to disrupt trash pickup, perhaps to hurt Mayor Ollie Tyler's chances in the coming runoff election, the mayor said Wednesday. Tyler said the former employee was wearing a campaign shirt for Adrian Perkins, the mayor's opponent in Saturday's election, and told sanitation workers that he soon would be their boss when instructing them not to appear for work on Monday and Tuesday — apparently suggesting that Perkins had tapped him to become city public works director. Sanitation and streets and drainage employees all work in the city Public Works Department. Tyler said the former employee's action appeared planned to affect the outcome of Saturday's election, although she said she couldn't be certain. "It's unfortunate if it was politically motivated." "I wouldn't have authorized this at all," Perkins said. Tyler and other city managers said 15 sanitation workers earlier this week called in sick and did not show up for work Monday and Tuesday, idling 10 to 12 collection trucks. Sheila Johnson, the union president for city employees, said the employees calling in sick were not politically motivated to do so. Crawford said the employees who called in sick attended a weekly safety meeting Wednesday morning with other employees but refused to stay when asked to assist in trash pickups. "We will not stand for employees playing politics with the daily operations of this city," Crawford said.

On Politics: Trump Gives Jim Mattis an Ominous Label

Good Monday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today. • As the world recoils at reports that the Saudis sent agents to Turkey to kill Jamal Khashoggi, a dissident journalist, Mr. Trump has rebuffed pressure to punish the Saudis by canceling arms sales that he secured during a visit last year. Here’s why that approach could put the president on a collision course with Congress. Then came the story about Mr. Khashoggi. Read our media columnist’s take. • Confidential documents reviewed by The Times indicate that Jared Kushner, Mr. Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, probably paid little or no income tax from 2009 to 2016. • Republican candidates across the country are painting Democrats as the ones pursuing an extreme immigration agenda that would fill the country with “sanctuary cities.” The strategy may be working. • Suburban women favor Democrats in the midterms by large margins. Read why.

On Politics: Trump Gives Jim Mattis an Ominous Label

Good Monday morning. Here are some of the stories making news in Washington and politics today. • As the world recoils at reports that the Saudis sent agents to Turkey to kill Jamal Khashoggi, a dissident journalist, Mr. Trump has rebuffed pressure to punish the Saudis by canceling arms sales that he secured during a visit last year. Here’s why that approach could put the president on a collision course with Congress. Then came the story about Mr. Khashoggi. Read our media columnist’s take. • Confidential documents reviewed by The Times indicate that Jared Kushner, Mr. Trump’s son-in-law and adviser, probably paid little or no income tax from 2009 to 2016. • Republican candidates across the country are painting Democrats as the ones pursuing an extreme immigration agenda that would fill the country with “sanctuary cities.” The strategy may be working. • Suburban women favor Democrats in the midterms by large margins. Read why.