GOP State Bills Take Aim At Roe V. Wade | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

GOP State Bills Take Aim At Roe V. Wade | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

Anti-abortion advocates are seeing success in several Republican-led states, with Alabama poised to pass the country’s toughest limits this week. The President and CEO of Planned Parenthood, Dr. Leana Wen, joins Stephanie Ruhle to explain what this means for women in America.
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GOP State Bills Take Aim At Roe V. Wade | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

GOP Onslaught On Abortion Aimed At Reversing Roe v. Wade | All In | MSNBC

GOP Onslaught On Abortion Aimed At Reversing Roe v. Wade | All In | MSNBC

Since Brett Kavanaugh’s appointment to the Supreme Court, more states are passing laws to restrict and even criminalize abortion.
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GOP Onslaught On Abortion Aimed At Reversing Roe v. Wade | All In | MSNBC

Live: Protest rally outside Supreme Court over 2020 citizenship question on census

Live: Protest rally outside Supreme Court over 2020 citizenship question on census

LIVE from Washington, D.C. – Common Cause holds a rally as the Supreme Court hears oral arguments over whether the 2020 census can include a question on an individual’s citizenship status. The Trump administration’s attempted change has been met with criticism by people who say the question would discourage many from taking part in the census and inceases its room for error.

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Trump sees his executive power tested in Supreme Court census case

Trump sees his executive power tested in Supreme Court census case

The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments about reinstating a citizenship question on the U.S. census; Doug McKelway reports from Washington. #AmericasNewsroom #FoxNews

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Time 100 recognizes both Kavanaugh and Blasey Ford

Time 100 recognizes both Kavanaugh and Blasey Ford

Time magazine under fire for putting Brett Kavanaugh on 100 most influential list; reaction from ‘Benson and Harf’ hosts Guy Benson and Marie Harf.

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Ex-Clinton official is trying to get Kavanaugh fired from teaching job

Ex-Clinton official is trying to get Kavanaugh fired from teaching job

Gillian Turner reports that former Clinton press secretary, Brian Fallon is trying to get Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh fired as a guest professor in the U.K.

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Supreme Court Set to Again Weigh Voting Maps Warped by Politics

J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court returns to the subject of partisan gerrymandering on Tuesday, considering for a second time in two years whether drawing election maps to help the party in power can ever violate the Constitution.

Last year’s cases, from Wisconsin and Maryland, raised the possibility that the court might decide, for the first time, that some election maps were so warped by politics that they crossed a constitutional line. Challengers had pinned their hopes on Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who had expressed ambivalence on the subject, but he and his colleagues appeared unable to identify a workable constitutional test.

The justices instead sidestepped the central questions in the two cases. On Tuesday, almost exactly a year after they last considered the Maryland case, the court will again hear arguments from Republican voters there who said their rights had been violated by a congressional district they said had been drawn to diminish their voting power.

The court will also hear arguments in a second challenge, this one from North Carolina Democrats who said the state’s congressional map yielded a 10-to-3 Republican majority despite very close statewide vote counts.

A ruling that limited partisan gerrymandering could transform American politics, reshaping House maps in several states, often but not always to the benefit of Democrats. But Justice Kennedy’s replacement by Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh makes such an outcome less likely, election law experts said. Indeed, the court could rule that the Constitution imposes no limits on the practice.

The Supreme Court has ruled that racial gerrymandering can violate the Constitution. But it has never struck down a voting map as an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander.

The court’s decision to hear the new partisan gerrymandering challenges did not signal any…

Will: The court should steer away from the politics of gerrymandering

Bob Brown, Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP, file photo Should the Supreme Court be expected to settle gerrymandering issues?

If an adjective creates a redundancy, does preceding it with two other adjectives give the Supreme Court a reason to venture where it has never gone before? Come Tuesday, the court will hear oral arguments urging it to referee gerrymandering in the drawing of congressional districts. The justices should, like Ulysses, listen to this siren song but bind themselves from obeying it.

The arguments will concern two cases: one from Maryland, where Republicans are aggrieved, another from North Carolina, where Democrats are unhappy. The practice the court will consider is (adjective one) “partisan gerrymandering.” This modifier, however, does not modify; there is no other kind of gerrymandering.

Tuesday’s issue is whether the court should attempt something for which it has neither an aptitude nor any constitutional warrant — concocting criteria for deciding when (adjective two) excessive partisan gerrymandering becomes (adjective three) unconstitutional.

Gerrymandering is generally as surreptitious as a brass band and is, always and everywhere, as political as lemonade is lemony. It is the drawing of district lines by faction A for the purpose of disadvantaging faction B. This practice is older than the republic: Pennsylvanians and North Carolinians were engaging in it in the first half of the 18th century, about a century before it acquired its name. (In 1812, Massachusetts Democratic-Republicans, serving Gov. Elbridge Gerry, drew a district shaped like a salamander.)

Until 1962, the court stayed away from the inherently political process of the drawing of district lines by legislatures organized along partisan lines because the Constitution is unambiguous: “The times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof.” There are enough open-textured terms in…

SCOTUS Should Steer Clear of the Politics of Gerrymandering

People arrive at a polling station as early voting begins in Carrboro, N.C., October 20, 2016.

The Constitution makes clear that legislative redistricting is a matter for the states and Congress, not the courts, to sort out.

If an adjective creates a redundancy, does preceding it with two other adjectives give the Supreme Court a reason to venture where it has never gone before? Come Tuesday, the Court will hear oral arguments urging it to referee gerrymandering in the drawing of congressional districts. The justices should, like Ulysses, listen to this siren song but bind themselves from obeying it.

The arguments will concern two cases: one from Maryland, where Republicans are aggrieved, another from North Carolina, where Democrats are unhappy. The practice the court will consider is (adjective one) “partisan gerrymandering.” This modifier, however, does not modify; there is no other kind of gerrymandering.

Tuesday’s issue is whether the court should attempt something for which it has neither an aptitude nor any constitutional warrant — concocting criteria for deciding when (adjective two) excessive partisan gerrymandering becomes (adjective three) unconstitutional.

Gerrymandering is generally as surreptitious as a brass band and is, always and everywhere, as political as lemonade is lemony. It is the drawing of district lines by faction A for the purpose of disadvantaging faction B. This practice is older than the republic: Pennsylvanians and North Carolinians were engaging in it in the first half of the 18th century, about a century before it acquired its name. (In 1812, Massachusetts Democratic-Republicans, serving Governor Elbridge Gerry, drew a district shaped like a salamander.)

Until 1962, the court stayed away from the inherently political process of the drawing of district lines by legislatures organized along partisan lines because…

George Will: The court should steer away from the politics of gerrymandering

WASHINGTON — If an adjective creates a redundancy, does preceding it with two other adjectives give the Supreme Court a reason to venture where it has never gone before? Come Tuesday, the court will hear oral arguments urging it to referee gerrymandering in the drawing of congressional districts. The justices should, like Ulysses, listen to this siren song but bind themselves from obeying it.

The arguments will concern two cases: one from Maryland, where Republicans are aggrieved, another from North Carolina, where Democrats are unhappy. The practice the court will consider is (adjective one) “partisan gerrymandering.” This modifier, however, does not modify; there is no other kind of gerrymandering.

Tuesday’s issue is whether the court should attempt something for which it has neither an aptitude nor any constitutional warrant — concocting criteria for deciding when (adjective two) excessive partisan gerrymandering becomes (adjective three) unconstitutional.

Gerrymandering is generally as surreptitious as a brass band and is, always and everywhere, as political as lemonade is lemony. It is the drawing of district lines by faction A for the purpose of disadvantaging faction B. This practice is older than the republic: Pennsylvanians and North Carolinians were engaging in it in the first half of the 18th century, about a century before it acquired its name. (In 1812, Massachusetts Democratic-Republicans, serving Gov. Elbridge Gerry, drew a district shaped like a salamander.)

Until 1962, the court stayed away from the inherently political process of the drawing of district lines by legislatures organized along partisan lines because the Constitution is unambiguous: “The times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, shall be prescribed in each state by the legislature thereof.” There are enough open-textured terms in the Constitution (“establishment” of religion, “unreasonable” searches, “cruel” punishments, etc.) to rescue the Supreme Court from ennui. The Elections Clause…