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Virginia’s Republican (PE World) Nominee for Governor

The Story: The Republican Party in Virginia, in a highly unusual Covid-era drive-through nominating convention, chose Glenn Youngkin as its candidate for Governor. Youngkin was...
Deval Patrick: I support impeaching Trump if ...

Deval Patrick Enters the 2020 Picture

The Story: Deval Patrick, a former Governor of Massachusetts (2007 - 2015), and since then a managing director at venture capital giant Bain Capital, formally...

Senator Romney (R – Utah) Increasingly at Odds with POTUS

The Story: In recent weeks Mitt Romney, a rookie Senator (elected from Utah in 2018) but long a prominent Republican and in 2012 that party's...

As Democrats Agonize, G.O.P. Is at Peace With Doing Nothing on Mueller’s Findings

Erin Schaff for The New York Times WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans see the special counsel’s report — with its stark evidence that President Trump repeatedly impeded the investigation into Russian election interference — as a summons for collective inaction. Republicans in the upper chamber, who would serve as Mr. Trump’s jury if House Democrats were to impeach him, reacted to the report’s release with a range of tsk-tsk adjectives like “brash,” “inappropriate” or “unflattering.” Only Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, called out the president’s behavior as “sickening.” Yet no Republican, not even Mr. Romney, a political brand-name who does not face his state’s voters until 2022, has pressed for even a cursory inquiry into the findings by the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, that the president pressured senior officials, including the former White House counsel Donald F. McGahn II and the former attorney general Jeff Sessions, to scuttle his investigation. “I consider this to be, basically, the end of the road,” said Senator Mike Lee, Republican of Utah, who once tried to thwart Mr. Trump’s presidential nomination and now serves on the Senate Judiciary Committee, which has the authority to investigate Mr. Mueller’s findings. “But there is a difference between unflattering and something that can and should be prosecuted.” Senator Rob Portman, Republican of Ohio, has been as critical in private of Mr. Trump’s actions as Mr. Romney has been in public, but he, too, said it was time to move on. “While the report documents a number of actions taken by the president or his associates that were inappropriate, the special counsel reached no conclusion on obstruction of justice,” Mr. Portman said in a statement. That is factually accurate; in releasing his findings a week ago, Mr. Mueller laid out about a dozen instances in which the president may have obstructed justice, but he left it to Congress to reach that conclusion, counseling “that Congress has authority to prohibit a president’s corrupt use of his authority.” House Democrats responded by ramping up committee investigations, kicking off what is likely to be a long, rending intraparty debate over impeachment. Next week, a bipartisan group of eight Senate and House leaders are scheduled to review an unredacted version of Mr. Mueller’s findings when they return from their spring recess. The chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Senator Lindsey Graham, a close Trump ally, said he had no plans to investigate — and has even suggested that if he pursues a new inquiry it would be to focus on allegations that federal law enforcement agencies conducted surveillance of Mr. Trump’s presidential campaign in 2016. But he added that Mr. Trump had “every right to feel good” about Mr. Mueller’s report. “When is it appropriate to misuse power so that you’re using your federal assets to go after a political opponent?

Political Cornflakes: Utah faces five competitors to host presidential debates

It said the other applicants are: Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn.; Hartford, Conn.; Creighton University in Omaha, Neb. ; the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich.; and the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. Three will be chosen for the highly watched events in the weeks leading up to the November election. [Trib][DNews][ABC4] -> Gov. Gary Herbert used a line-item veto to erase spending $800,000 that lawmakers had approved for a sound wall as a favor to homebuilder Bryson Garbett, a former legislator. [Trib][DNews] -> Utah Sens. @GarbettforMayor 's dad can easily get funding for a sound wall for his undeveloped land while the west side neighborhoods of SLC had to tirelessly fight for their own sound wall for years. [Trib] -> Early discussions are underway to revive a bill to ban conversion therapy, aimed at changing a persons sexual orientation or gender identity, on minors. [NYTimes] -> Some members of special counsel Robert S. Mueller’s team say Attorney General William P. Barr failed to fully disclose the gravity of certain portions of the Mueller report that covered investigations into the presidential campaign. [WaPost][NYTimes][Politico] -> House Democrats requested six years of tax returns for President Donald Trump, and are preparing to issue a subpoena for the full Mueller report from the Justice Department.

The great political parachute

Sure, the market for Democratic presidential candidates is getting a little saturated. Because there's almost never a downside to running. The candidates of the crowded fields in the last few presidential elections — even the also-rans — almost always came out ahead or, at worst, ended up in the same place. No Democrat will say they're running for something else, like vice president or cabinet secretary. But that's where some of them will end up, if the Democratic nominee beats President Trump. If Trump wins, some of them are young enough to give it another try in four years. And if that doesn't happen, they can always become a cable news talking head. A quick look at the "whatever happened to them" file: Hillary Clinton (2008) became Barack Obama's secretary of state before moving on to that other presidential race. Joe Biden (2008) became his vice president. Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio, Lindsey Graham and Rand Paul (2016) all went back to the Senate.

Major Political Donors Indicted In Sweeping College Admissions Investigation

Major Democratic and Republican donors were indicted Tuesday in a college admissions scandal which led to the arrests of CEOs and famous actresses in a wide-ranging federal investigation. There is no evidence that those who were indicted Tuesday used their access to elected officials to help their children gain admission to top universities. HuffPost has asked all of the candidates and committees who were beneficiaries of campaign contributions from the people indicted Tuesday whether they plan to donate or return the campaign contributions and whether the elected officials ever aided the donors with their children’s college admissions by writing a letter or contacting the secondary education institutions in any way to support or influence their admission decisions. Other politicians and organizations had not responded by Tuesday evening. The contributions were made to both Democratic and Republican candidates and committees. The contributions included: At least $131,800 to committees benefiting or controlled by then-presidential candidate and current U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) At least $30,000 to committees benefiting Gavin Newsom At least $25,000 to the Kamala Harris Senate Committee and the committee for her California attorney general candidacy At least $16,900 to committees benefiting or controlled by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) $8,350 to the National Republican Campaign Committee $8,350 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee The indicted contributors included: Agustin Huneeus, vintner $30,000 in contributions to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s campaign committees. Robert Flaxman, CEO of Crown Realty & Development Total federal contributions: $143,065.80 $50,000 to Romney Victory Fund in 2012 $2,300 to Romney presidential campaign in 2007 $8,100 to Chris Van Hollen’s Senate account (all contributions were disbursed through a joint committee on Sept. 30, 2016) $33,400 to the Democratic National Committee $8,350 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee $10,000 to the California Republican Party Federal Account $35,800 to the Republican National Committee $8,350 to the National Republican Congressional Committee Gordon Caplan, attorney Caplan has contributed $86,750 to federal candidates and committees. A total of $14,700 to Kirsten Gillibrand’s Senate campaign $1,250 to Gillibrand’s political action committee $5,700 to committees controlled by Sen. Kamala Harris $30,800 to the DNC through the Obama Victory Fund in 2012 $7,350 to Harris’ California attorney general campaign committees Robert Zangrillo, CEO, Dragon Global $50,000 to Romney Victory Fund in 2012 $30,800 to the Republican National Committee 2012 (distributed through the Romney Victory Fund) Abdelaziz Gamal, former casino executive $40,196 in total contributions to federal candidates and committees $33,096 in contributions to the MGM Resorts International PAC Douglas Hodge, former Pimco CEO $29,000 in total contributions to federal campaign funds $5,000 to the Investment Company Institute PAC $10,000 to Securities Association PAC Manuel Henriquez, chairman and CEO of Hercules Technology Growth Capital $19,530 in total federal contributions $16,450 to the Democratic National Committee Mossimo Giannulli, fashion designer, and Lori Loughlin, actress $12,800 in total contributions to federal candidates and committees $5,000 to Romney Victory in 2012 (via Mossimo Giannulli) Felicity Huffman, actress $10,719.17 in total federal contributions $1,537.50 of which was to the Kamala Harris Senate campaign committee Bruce Isackson, president of WP Investments, and Davina Isackson $2,500 to the Romney presidential campaign (via Bruce Isackson) $3,500 to the Congressional Leadership Fund, a Republican super PAC, in 2017 (via Bruce Isackson) Michelle Janavs, former executive of a food manufacturer $5,000 to the Romney Victory Fund in 2012 Marci Palatella, owner of Preservation Distillery John B. Wilson, president and CEO of Hyannis Port Capital CORRECTION: In an earlier version of this article, donations were listed from Agustin Huneeus to the Democratic National Committee and Reps. Mike Thompson and Nancy Pelosi. Those donations have not been confirmed.

Major Political Donors Indicted In Sweeping College Admissions Investigation

Major Democratic and Republican donors were indicted Tuesday in a college admissions scandal which led to the arrests of CEOs and famous actresses in a wide-ranging federal investigation. There is no evidence that those who were indicted Tuesday used their access to elected officials to help their children gain admission to top universities. HuffPost has asked all of the candidates and committees who were beneficiaries of campaign contributions from the people indicted Tuesday whether they plan to donate or return the campaign contributions and whether the elected officials ever aided the donors with their children’s college admissions by writing a letter or contacting the secondary education institutions in any way to support or influence their admission decisions. Other politicians and organizations had not responded by Tuesday evening. The contributions were made to both Democratic and Republican candidates and committees. The contributions included: At least $131,800 to committees benefiting or controlled by then-presidential candidate and current U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney (R-Utah) At least $30,000 to committees benefiting Gavin Newsom At least $25,000 to the Kamala Harris Senate Committee and the committee for her California attorney general candidacy At least $16,900 to committees benefiting or controlled by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) $8,350 to the National Republican Campaign Committee $8,350 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee The indicted contributors included: Agustin Huneeus, vintner $30,000 in contributions to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s campaign committees. Robert Flaxman, CEO of Crown Realty & Development Total federal contributions: $143,065.80 $50,000 to Romney Victory Fund in 2012 $2,300 to Romney presidential campaign in 2007 $8,100 to Chris Van Hollen’s Senate account (all contributions were disbursed through a joint committee on Sept. 30, 2016) $33,400 to the Democratic National Committee $8,350 to the National Republican Senatorial Committee $10,000 to the California Republican Party Federal Account $35,800 to the Republican National Committee $8,350 to the National Republican Congressional Committee Gordon Caplan, attorney Caplan has contributed $86,750 to federal candidates and committees. A total of $14,700 to Kirsten Gillibrand’s Senate campaign $1,250 to Gillibrand’s political action committee $5,700 to committees controlled by Sen. Kamala Harris $30,800 to the DNC through the Obama Victory Fund in 2012 $7,350 to Harris’ California attorney general campaign committees Robert Zangrillo, CEO, Dragon Global $50,000 to Romney Victory Fund in 2012 $30,800 to the Republican National Committee 2012 (distributed through the Romney Victory Fund) Abdelaziz Gamal, former casino executive $40,196 in total contributions to federal candidates and committees $33,096 in contributions to the MGM Resorts International PAC Douglas Hodge, former Pimco CEO $29,000 in total contributions to federal campaign funds $5,000 to the Investment Company Institute PAC $10,000 to Securities Association PAC Manuel Henriquez, chairman and CEO of Hercules Technology Growth Capital $19,530 in total federal contributions $16,450 to the Democratic National Committee Mossimo Giannulli, fashion designer, and Lori Loughlin, actress $12,800 in total contributions to federal candidates and committees $5,000 to Romney Victory in 2012 (via Mossimo Giannulli) Felicity Huffman, actress $10,719.17 in total federal contributions $1,537.50 of which was to the Kamala Harris Senate campaign committee Bruce Isackson, president of WP Investments, and Davina Isackson $2,500 to the Romney presidential campaign (via Bruce Isackson) $3,500 to the Congressional Leadership Fund, a Republican super PAC, in 2017 (via Bruce Isackson) Michelle Janavs, former executive of a food manufacturer $5,000 to the Romney Victory Fund in 2012 Marci Palatella, owner of Preservation Distillery John B. Wilson, president and CEO of Hyannis Port Capital CORRECTION: In an earlier version of this article, donations were listed from Agustin Huneeus to the Democratic National Committee and Reps. Mike Thompson and Nancy Pelosi. Those donations have not been confirmed.

As Cobb County trends blue, so goes Georgia statewide politics

On the other side is a symbol of Cobb’s future, the Marietta Walk homes, one of many developments bringing new voters to an area that was the cradle of Newt Gingrich’s political career a few short decades ago. In 2012, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney won Cobb County by 12 percentage points and won Georgia by eight points. In 2016, the county swung Democratic as Hillary Clinton won Cobb by two points, even as she lost the state overall by five points. “I tend to look at this going back to 2016 when one of the most monumental things that happened was when Hillary Clinton actually won the top of the ticket here in Cobb,” said Michael Owens, the Cobb County Democratic Party Chairman. “It’s the first time in 40 years that a Democrat has won the top of the ticket.” “In 2018, in Cobb County, we carried every statewide election by 30,000 votes or more,” Owens noted. Since 2010, Cobb’s population has swelled by 10 percent, outpacing overall growth in the state. “I’d say younger people in this area definitely change the politics in this area. It’s definitely a younger crowd moving in.” That’s just Cobb County, of course. Brian Kemp lost Cobb County, but it still produced the most Republican votes of any county in the state. “I think Georgia’s been a swing state before.

Sarah Isgur’s CNN role changes from politics editor to commentator

New York (CNN Business)Former Justice Department spokeswoman Sarah Isgur, whose hiring by CNN stirred controversy last month, is no longer taking a job as a political editor in the Washington bureau. She tweeted on Friday: "It's been a great vacation but I am back on twitter! And news: I will go to CNN as a Political Analyst instead. Isgur is a longtime Republican political operative who previously worked for Carly Fiorina, Ted Cruz and Mitt Romney. She served as the DOJ's top spokeswoman during Jeff Sessions' tenure as attorney general. Earlier this year she met with television network executives and showed an interest in moving from politics to journalism. Even once it was clarified that she'd be reporting to political director David Chalian, and would be one of several people involved in coordinating 2020 coverage, there were still deep concerns about the role -- including from inside CNN. She was set to start working at CNN next week. But a network spokeswoman indicated that Isgur proposed a shift away from the editor role. "We can confirm that when Sarah came to us and proposed her role be adjusted to a political analyst instead, we agreed and we look forward to her starting in that role," the CNN spokeswoman said Friday afternoon.