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Klobuchar’s Views on Education Policy

The Story:  Senator Amy Klobuchar (D - Minn), one of the Democratic Party's candidates for President, announced what she calls a "Progress Partnership" plan last...
NYU Prof. On College Admissions: 'We’re Drunk On Exclusivity' | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

NYU Prof. On College Admissions: ‘We’re Drunk On Exclusivity’ | Velshi & Ruhle |...

After actress Felicity Huffman pleads guilty in the “Varsity Blues” scandal, NYU Stern School of Business professor Scott Galloway joins Stephanie Ruhle to explain the correlation between the pressure students and parents feel to get into top schools and personal…

This Week in Education Politics: 2020 Federal Funding Comes Into Focus, the State of...

(See previous editions here.) You can get the preview delivered straight to your inbox by signing up for The 74 Newsletter; for rolling updates on federal education policy, follow Carolyn Phenicie on Twitter @cphenicie. INBOX: APPROPRIATIONS — The 2020 budget-writing season kicks off this week, as a House subcommittee takes the first crack at writing a spending bill covering the Education Department. But members also challenged DeVos on other proposed cuts, including an end to Title II teacher training grants, ESSA Title IV grants that support areas like technology and mental health, and after-school programs. Outside of those programs — which Congress is sure to fund, as they have the last two years over administration asks to cut them — look for the Democratic-controlled subcommittee to increase funding for longstanding K-12 programs like Title I grants for low-income students and IDEA special education grants. The federal charter school program could be a flash point, too. This is just the start of what will be a months-long process to write a spending bill for the department, and the rest of the federal government, ahead of the new fiscal year Oct. 1. Former Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Thomas B. Fordham Institute President Mike Petrilli are among the speakers. The group will also release new polling data on “public attitudes about effective solutions to better address disciplinary challenges in schools.” WEDNESDAY: SCHOOL REFORM & STUDENTS — The Thomas B. Fordham Institute holds the penultimate event in its Education 20/20 series. Former Education Secretary Rod Paige will argue that real school reform will require schools to hold students accountable and foster a culture that “emphasizes innate abilities and that celebrates academics over ball games and socializing.” Peter Wehner, senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, will discuss the importance of character education.
DeVos on defense for cutting Special Olympics funding

DeVos on defense for cutting Special Olympics funding

House Democrats skewer Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Capitol Hill over the Trump administration's plan to eliminate millions in federal grants to the Special Olympics; Doug McKelway reports from Washington. FOX News operates the FOX News Channel (FNC), FOX Business…
Betsy DeVos Proposal To Cut Special Olympics Funding Sparks Outrage | Rachel l Maddow | MSNBC

Betsy DeVos Proposal To Cut Special Olympics Funding Sparks Outrage | Rachel l Maddow...

Rep. Mark Pocan talks with Rachel Maddow about his confrontation of Trump Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over her proposed elimination of federal funding for the Special Olympics. » Subscribe to MSNBC: http://on.msnbc.com/SubscribeTomsnbc MSNBC delivers breaking news and in-depth analysis of…

The Week Ahead in Education Politics: DeVos and Democrats Expected to Clash as Ed...

(See previous editions here.) You can get the preview delivered straight to your inbox by signing up for The 74 Newsletter; for rolling updates on federal education policy, follow Carolyn Phenicie on Twitter @cphenicie. A brief rundown: —In 2017, she battled with House Democrats over civil rights protections for students participating in a proposed voucher program. This year should be no different, with Democrats having already panned the administration’s budget requests. Additionally, President Trump signed an executive order that will require colleges that receive federal research dollars to certify that they’re upholding the First Amendment. The executive order also will require the Education Department to post more student earnings and loan default data on the College Scorecard, and to put together a report on “risk-sharing,” the idea that colleges should be held financially responsible when graduates can’t repay their loans. MONDAY: PUBLIC SCHOOLS WEEK — The Learning First Alliance, an umbrella group of a dozen education groups, hosts Public Schools Week, including Capitol Hill events on protections for students with disabilities and church-state issues in education. MONDAY: FREE SPEECH IN HIGHER ED — The Bipartisan Policy Center holds a panel discussion on free speech and intellectual diversity in higher education. TUESDAY: WORKERS’ RIGHTS — The House Education and Labor Committee holds a hearing on protecting workers’ rights and “the need for labor law reform.” Several states passed laws in the run-up of the Janus decision last year to strengthen public sector union rights ahead of the Supreme Court’s decision to end mandatory union dues. WEDNESDAY: BUDGET MEMBER DAY — The House Appropriations subcommittee opens a hearing for House Members to share their spending priorities in the Education, Labor and Health and Human Services departments.

Praise and education political points: How Colorado is responding to the end of Denver’s...

The reactions began as soon as the deal was announced, with a tweet from Gov. While it’s unfortunate that this agreement was not reached prior to the strike, today’s results are a testament to Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association’s commitment to working together in the best interest of our children. Denver’s kids are the biggest winners in today’s agreement, and I think everyone is relieved that the strike is over and students and teachers will be back in school working together to build a brighter future for themselves and our community. @ColoradoEA @DenverTeachers #DCTAstrong #RedForEd @AmieBacaOehlert pic.twitter.com/0RLeyaAgi6 — Lily Eskelsen García (@Lily_NEA) February 14, 2019 Colorado Education Association President Amie Baca-Oehlert, head of the state teachers union to which the Denver union belongs, held up Denver teachers as models for the rest of the state. Denver educators didn’t just fight for their students, profession and community. From an official at A+ Colorado: Good news and progress here. #edcolo https://t.co/aPaBvY2k2o — Landon Mascareñaz (@lmascarenaz) February 14, 2019 And from Stand for Children Colorado: We are so happy @DenverTeachers and @DPSNewsNow reached a deal where educators get a raise, equity incentives are protected, and now students and teachers are back to the classroom! The teachers themselves should be proud — they are getting a 10 percent raise. But unfortunately for the union’s credibility, it’s essentially the same raise they were offered before the strike. (The district did not put much more money on the table to reach the deal, but it did agree to changes the union wanted in terms of how educators earn raises.

Darla Moore says SC’s ‘horrific’ education results demand sweeping reforms

FLORENCE — Teachers should walk out en masse and the state’s biggest employers should threaten to leave if legislators don’t pass sweeping changes this year to begin transforming South Carolina’s education system, said leading businesswoman and philanthropist Darla Moore. “If I were a Boeing or BMW — 1) I would not come to South Carolina because of the education system. Today, given their economic power in this state, those and others, I would go to the leadership of this state and say, ‘You need to do something about this or I’m going to leave,’” said Moore. She’s a Lake City native whose latest projects include a $23 million career center she’s funding for local high-schoolers. Henry McMaster and House Speaker Jay Lucas in the months since the report, saying they’ve shown courage he hasn’t seen in decades. Carter called Lucas’ bill introduced last week a “fantastic beginning.” The massive, 84-page bill requires new approaches in not only K-12 schools but also technical colleges and universities’ teacher-training programs. “This is an existential crisis.” The sweeping reforms she advocates include tossing out the way teachers are paid — something Lucas’ bill would eventually do — which is sure to draw opposition from teacher advocacy groups as it moves through the legislative process. Lucas proposes phasing in a 10 percent pay raise over the next two to three years — which teachers are applauding — but then switching to a system that promotes teachers according to performance and duties, which some are calling a nonstarter. I’m going to give you a really good raise,’ or ’You’re a terrible teacher. “Our students need every precious minute of class time they get in the state of South Carolina,” he said.
Karen Pence criticized for teaching at Christian school

Karen Pence criticized for teaching at Christian school

The vice president's wife will be returning to her old job as an art teacher. #TheStory #MarthaMacCallum #FoxNews FOX News Channel (FNC) is a 24-hour all-encompassing news service dedicated to delivering breaking news as well as political and business news.…

This Week In Education Politics: With Shutdown in Background, Congress Focuses on Disaster Aid...

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION POLITICS publishes most Saturdays. School districts throughout the D.C. region are expediting free and reduced price lunch applications for children of furloughed federal workers, and some urged affected families to requests breaks on after-school program fees, The Washington Post reported. The program is run under the auspices of the shuttered Agriculture Department. Officials had originally said the program could keep running on surplus funds “into February,” but in a memo to program providers said it would continue “well into March.” ON THE HORIZON: TITLE IX COMMENTS — Congressional Democrats urged the Education Department to extend the comment period for proposed changes to Title IX rules governing how schools handle allegations of sexual assault. The Education Department did not respond to a request for comment from The 74. More than 50,000 public comments had been submitted as of Jan. 10. MONDAY: HIGHER ED REGS — The Education Department starts a week of negotiated rulemaking sessions to hash out regulations on a variety of higher ed issues, including accreditation and online learning. The event is held annually (see our coverage from 2017 and 2018) as part of National School Choice Week. The Justice Department during the Trump Administration has been involved in a variety of education-related issues, including the repeal of student discipline guidance and protections for transgender students, the end of the DACA program, and school safety. The federal program, authorized in 2014, allows Early Head Start, a spinoff of the federal preschool program for low-income children under age 3, to integrate into existing child care centers and family care providers.