Klobuchar’s Views on Education Policy

The Story: 

Senator Amy Klobuchar (D – Minn), one of the Democratic Party’s candidates for President, announced what she calls a “Progress Partnership” plan last week. This is a program to provide federal aid to states that agree to: increase teachers’ pay in their public schools, update the high school curricula, and demonstrate an equitable system to repair their schools.

Background:

Klobuchar is languishing in the polls, oscillating between 1% and 2% support. She is doing somewhat better in Iowa, site of the first actual primary season vote (a caucus, scheduled for February 3, 2020). Iowa borders Minnesota, so Klobuchar is more familiar to voters there than to voters in much of the rest of the country. Still, even there she is only in the mid single digits.

She may reasonably hope to improve her position by stressing important issues thus far largely unexplored in this campaign, and education policy is among them.

The Thing to Know:

Klobucher spoke about her plan at a forum hosted in Houston, Texas on Friday, July 5 by the National Education Association. She described herself there as the daughter of a teacher, adding that her mother “taught second grade until she was 70 years old.” That, even more than her policy specifics, won a warm response from the crowd.

NYU Prof. On College Admissions: ‘We’re Drunk On Exclusivity’ | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

NYU Prof. On College Admissions: 'We’re Drunk On Exclusivity' | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

After actress Felicity Huffman pleads guilty in the “Varsity Blues” scandal, NYU Stern School of Business professor Scott Galloway joins Stephanie Ruhle to explain the correlation between the pressure students and parents feel to get into top schools and personal value and happiness as mentioned in his new book, “Algebra of Happiness.”
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NYU Prof. On College Admissions: ‘We’re Drunk On Exclusivity’ | Velshi & Ruhle | MSNBC

This Week in Education Politics: 2020 Federal Funding Comes Into Focus, the State of Integration 65 Years After Brown, Entrepreneurship at HBCUs & More

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION POLITICS publishes most Saturdays. (See previous editions here.) You can get the preview delivered straight to your inbox by signing up for The 74 Newsletter; for rolling updates on federal education policy, follow Carolyn Phenicie on Twitter @cphenicie.

INBOX: APPROPRIATIONS — The 2020 budget-writing season kicks off this week, as a House subcommittee takes the first crack at writing a spending bill covering the Education Department.

The subcommittee, now under Democratic control, notably clashed with Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over the Trump Administration’s proposal to end federal funding to the Special Olympics, a spat that drew national press attention and eventually led to Trump walking back the proposal.

But members also challenged DeVos on other proposed cuts, including an end to Title II teacher training grants, ESSA Title IV grants that support areas like technology and mental health, and after-school programs.

Outside of those programs — which Congress is sure to fund, as they have the last two years over administration asks to cut them — look for the Democratic-controlled subcommittee to increase funding for longstanding K-12 programs like Title I grants for low-income students and IDEA special education grants.

The federal charter school program could be a flash point, too. It has long had bipartisan support and received big increases in recent years, but some Democratic members of the subcommittee were skeptical of DeVos’s support for the program amid what they said were subpar results.

The committee meets at 4 p.m. Tuesday, and bill text is expected about 24 hours ahead of time. This is just the start of what will be a months-long process to write a spending bill…

DeVos on defense for cutting Special Olympics funding

DeVos on defense for cutting Special Olympics funding

House Democrats skewer Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Capitol Hill over the Trump administration’s plan to eliminate millions in federal grants to the Special Olympics; Doug McKelway reports from Washington.

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Betsy DeVos Proposal To Cut Special Olympics Funding Sparks Outrage | Rachel l Maddow | MSNBC

Betsy DeVos Proposal To Cut Special Olympics Funding Sparks Outrage | Rachel l Maddow | MSNBC

Rep. Mark Pocan talks with Rachel Maddow about his confrontation of Trump Education Secretary Betsy DeVos over her proposed elimination of federal funding for the Special Olympics.
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Betsy DeVos Proposal To Cut Special Olympics Funding Sparks Outrage | Rachel l Maddow | MSNBC

The Week Ahead in Education Politics: DeVos and Democrats Expected to Clash as Ed Secretary Testifies on Budget; Committees Look at Child Abuse Prevention, Apprenticeships & More

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION POLITICS publishes most Saturdays. (See previous editions here.) You can get the preview delivered straight to your inbox by signing up for The 74 Newsletter; for rolling updates on federal education policy, follow Carolyn Phenicie on Twitter @cphenicie.

INBOX: DEVOS TO THE HILL — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos will testify on the administration’s budget request before both the House and Senate this week.

She’s clashed with Democrats in these hearings before. A brief rundown:

—In 2017, she battled with House Democrats over civil rights protections for students participating in a proposed voucher program. In the Senate, she similarly faced questions on civil rights protections, particularly for LGBT students, and on ESSA implementation.

—Last year was more of the same. She again went several rounds with members of the House Appropriations committee on protections for LGBT students and battled with them on school safety issues, while a hearing at the Education Committee turned to vouchers for military families and immigration enforcement at schools.

This year should be no different, with Democrats having already panned the administration’s budget requests. The proposal, like the administration’s last two, seeks deep cuts to long-standing Education Department programs and expansion of school choice initiatives. DeVos is set to appear at a House Appropriations subcommittee on Tuesday, and one in the Senate on Thursday.

ICYMI: WHITE HOUSE ON HIGHER ED — The White House put forward its priorities for the ongoing rewrite of the Higher Education Act, focusing on workforce needs.

Additionally, President Trump signed an executive order that will require…

Praise and education political points: How Colorado is responding to the end of Denver’s teacher strike

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock met with preschool families in 2014 before announcing his support for a tax increase for the Denver Preschool Program.

The reactions began as soon as the deal was announced, with a tweet from Gov. Jared Polis expressing relief that the labor dispute between the Denver school district and its teacher union was over.

Polis was among the many Coloradans weighing in about the end of the strike that kept many Denver teachers out of schools for three days this week. Like him, many said they were excited that schools could begin to return to normal, while people on both sides of the dispute claimed political wins. We’ll document the reactions here.

Gov. Jared Polis declined to intervene before the strike, saying that doing so could slow down the path toward a resolution. Here’s his complete statement today:

I am pleased that after months of negotiations, both sides stepped up, worked together, and found a solution that works for our district, our educators, our parents, and most importantly our children.

While it’s unfortunate that this agreement was not reached prior to the strike, today’s results are a testament to Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association’s commitment to working together in the best interest of our children.

Denver’s kids are the biggest winners in today’s agreement, and I think everyone is relieved that the strike is over and students and teachers will be back in school working together to build a brighter future for themselves and our community.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock made the Denver Public Library’s central branch available for bargaining, kept the building open through the night, and sent over food for teachers and district officials. His statement notes the role he played during the strike:

It’s good news that the DCTA and DPS have reached a tentative agreement. I know from the several calls and meetings I undertook with both sides, that it has been challenging to build trust and reach an agreement. Our students are the biggest winners with this deal, and I’m sure they’ll be happy to have their teachers back in their classrooms.

Here’s what Lily Eskelsen Garcia, president of the National Education Association teachers union, tweeted this morning:

All week, the nation has looked to Denver with hopeful hearts. We are so proud of Denver’s educators and this historic agreement that will provide greater opportunity for students and stability for their schools. @ColoradoEA @DenverTeachers #DCTAstrong #RedForEd @AmieBacaOehlert pic.twitter.com/0RLeyaAgi6

— Lily Eskelsen García (@Lily_NEA) February 14, 2019

Darla Moore says SC’s ‘horrific’ education results demand sweeping reforms

Minimally Adequate panel discussion in Florence
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The panel for The Post and Courier’s education discussion Monday, Jan. 28, in Florence include Colleton County Superintendent Franklin Foster, Florence District 3 (Lake City) Superintendent Laura Hickson, Francis Marion University President Fred Carter and businesswoman Darla Moore, a philanthropist and Lake City native who founded education nonprofits. Seanna Adcox/Staff

By Seanna Adcox sadcox@postandcourier.com

FLORENCE — Teachers should walk out en masse and the state’s biggest employers should threaten to leave if legislators don’t pass sweeping changes this year to begin transforming South Carolina’s education system, said leading businesswoman and philanthropist Darla Moore.

South Carolina’s “horrific” education results require a comprehensive makeover, she said Monday at The Post and Courier’s panel discussion on education titled, “Minimally Adequate: Fix South Carolina Schools.” It was the last of a four-event series held across the state.

“If I were a Boeing or BMW — 1) I would not come to South Carolina because of the education system. Today, given their economic power in this state, those and others, I would go to the leadership of this state and say, ‘You need to do something about this or I’m going to leave,’” said Moore. She’s a Lake City native whose latest projects include a $23 million career center she’s funding for local high-schoolers.

Legislative leaders have made overhauling South Carolina’s education system their top priority in the wake of The Post and Courier’s Minimally Adequate series. Last November’s five-part series laid out how gaping disparities have made South Carolina’s public school system one of the nation’s worst and left thousands of students unprepared for college or work after high school.

Francis Marion University President Fred Carter applauded the promises made by Gov. Henry McMaster and House Speaker Jay Lucas in…

Karen Pence criticized for teaching at Christian school

Karen Pence criticized for teaching at Christian school

The vice president’s wife will be returning to her old job as an art teacher. #TheStory #MarthaMacCallum #FoxNews

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This Week In Education Politics: With Shutdown in Background, Congress Focuses on Disaster Aid for Districts, Higher Ed Regulations, School Choice & More

THIS WEEK IN EDUCATION POLITICS publishes most Saturdays. (See previous editions here.) You can get the preview delivered straight to your inbox by signing up for The 74 Newsletter; for rolling updates on federal education policy, follow Carolyn Phenicie on Twitter @cphenicie.

INBOX: SHUTDOWN WEEK 4 — As the partial federal government shutdown, now the longest ever, enters its fourth week, both sides remain entrenched. A deal floated by some Senate Republicans to fund the border wall in exchange for passage of a law protecting DACA recipients is off the table. The ongoing stalemate has taken the wind out of the sails of most other congressional activity.

Though the Education Department has a full year of funding and is up and running as usual, there have been impacts to students, particularly those living in the D.C. area, where federal employees account for about 11.5 percent of the workforce, and about 145,000 people have been furloughed.

In Northern Virginia, Fairfax Public Schools officials held an event to hire out-of-work feds as substitute teachers; one event held last week quickly reached capacity and officials planned another session this week, according to NBC Washington.

School districts throughout the D.C. region are expediting free and reduced price lunch applications for children of furloughed federal workers, and some urged affected families to requests breaks on after-school program fees, The Washington Post reported.

A spokesperson for the School Nutrition Association, which represents cafeteria workers, said the group has not heard of similar needs for the school lunch program outside of Washington.

The program is run under the auspices of the shuttered Agriculture Department. Officials had originally said the program could keep running on surplus funds “into February,” but in a memo to program providers said it would continue “well into March.”

ON THE HORIZON: TITLE IX COMMENTS —…