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Boedeker, Jones talk politics in election

We need to focus on growing middle-class jobs in Cleburne that people will be willing to relocate and plug into our community for. We have to focus on job growth to make sustained retail investment possible. Q: What is the most pressing issue facing Cleburne and how would you address it if elected? We have to decide what we want our City to look like 10, 25, and 50 years from today, and then we have to start building toward it. I understand it was purchased to be used as the new police department until further research proved it would be too costly to renovate for that purpose. This would cost less than a new building, provide our police department with larger facilities, and save time. TXDOT projects take a good amount of time to hash out and complete. Q: What is the most pressing issue facing Cleburne and how would you address it if elected? If the efforts of our new staff in these departments were communicated, I believe it would alleviate this negativity and open the door for our community to weigh in on these issues in a constructive manner. The key to Cleburne’s growth and well being is a constructive connection between the city, council, and the community.

State Budget Fallout & More: The Week Ahead in New York Politics, April 1

Twitter What to watch for this week in New York politics: This week will be dominated by dissection of and fallout from the new state budget, a $175.5 billion spending and policy plan agreed to by Governor Andrew Cuomo and the Legislature over the weekend. Items like a new congestion pricing plan for New York City and making permanent the 2 percent annual property tax cap for all areas outside the city span both fiscal and policy areas. The City Council has a quieter week after just having wrapped up an intense month of hearings on Mayor de Blasio’s $92 billion preliminary budget. The mayor’s executive budget, which will take into account the Council hearings and response, as well as the new state budget, and more, is due toward the end of this month. There are some City Council hearings this week, plus other events around the city -- see our day-by-day rundown below. ***Do you have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics? e-mail Gotham Gazette editor Ben Max: bmax@gothamgazette.com*** The run of the week in detail: Monday At 8:15 a.m. Monday, NYC Health + Hospitals President Mitchell Katz will speak to the Citizens Budget Commission at the Yale Club. Tuesday The New York State Legislature will be in session on Tuesday in Albany. At 11 a.m. Wednesday, Mayor de Blasio will speak to the Atlantic’s “Renewal Summit” at CNVS in Midtown, discussing “how cities like New York can keep growing, while staying true to those who have long called it home.” At the City Council on Wednesday: --The Subcommittee on Landmarks, Public Siting, and Maritime Uses will meet at 10:45 a.m. --The Committee on Land Use will meet at 1 p.m. Thursday At the City Council on Thursday: The Committee on Technology will meet at 1 p.m. for an oversight hearing regarding “automated decision systems used by agencies.” At 9:30 a.m. Thursday, the Rent Guidelines Board will meet at the Landmarks Preservation Commission Conference Room in the Manhattan Municipal Building. Mayor de Blasio may make his weekly appearance on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show on Friday at 10 a.m. *** Have events or topics for us to include in an upcoming Week Ahead in New York Politics?

Q&A: District 15 Madison City Council candidates

Grant Foster Because I love Madison and I want to do everything I can to make it an even better place to live. My professional experience and skills combined with the knowledge and experience I gained working within Madison’s city government have prepared me to be a very effective leader on the Council and a strong advocate for District 15. I’ve been very involved with city governance for the last five years and have an in-depth understanding of city processes, the work of the council, and the major issues facing our community. The Milwaukee Street Special Area Plan was also just approved by the Common Council and it looks to capitalize on the excellent public transit access by adding significant housing as well. It will also bring greater opportunity to improve access to public transportation for those that live and work in the district. This is both an exciting and pivotal time for our city, Madison, with projected growth in population over the course of the next few years. In addition, as a first generation immigrant, I will bring diversity to the council and will work hard to ensure all segments of the city are represented. Our city is growing and with growth, comes change. It is pertinent for council members to listen and gain input from their respective communities and work collectively to maintain our strong and diverse communities as part of the legislative and oversight function. Our communities are evolving and the council has the opportunity to impact the lives of its residents positively and make our beloved city, the best that it can be for all.

Fall River Councilors push back against ‘revenge politics’

Durfee Building Committee was politically motivated, two City Councilors submitted a request for emergency legislation that would require council approval before any such mayoral actions. Sponsored by City Council Vice President Pam Laliberte-Lebeau and Councilor Shawn Cadime, the resolution states that “political retaliation continues by the current Mayor at an alarming rate” and identified the most recent “revenge politics” against recall election candidate and School Committee member Paul Coogan, who ran against Correia, and School Committee Vice Chairman Mark Costa, who publicly supported Coogan - both of whom Correia removed less than 24 hours after he was recalled then re-elected as mayor. He’s also concerned with Correia’s latest claims that he’ll alleviate the storm water fee which helps fund the city’s ongoing CSO project. City Councilor Stephen Long, who voted against removing Correia in November, made no bones where he now stands. Councilor Steven Camara will not change his mind if a special meeting is called. Councilors Joseph Camara, who is out of town, and Derek Viveiros could not be immediately reached for comment. However, even if they did change their vote the measure would fail. Correia offered several versions to The Herald News on why Coogan and Costa were ousted from the volunteer board and contradicted an email he sent the superintendent Wednesday night when he initiated the action, saying that he was merely changing them from voting to non-voting members. On Thursday Correia claimed he removed the School Committee members in order to “diversify the committee.” On Friday in an in-person interview with a reporter, Correia complained that Coogan failed to contact him the night of the race to concede the election. A few hours later on Friday, Correia was a guest on Providence’s WPRO-AM with radio host Dan Yorke when the two-term mayor admitted dropping Coogan was politically motivated for having run against him and “tried to get my job.” “He’s not going to be using the school committee and the building committee to launch a campaign against me.

Politics Report: The Lure No City Attorney Can Avoid Anymore

Eleven years since he lost re-election, former San Diego City Attorney Mike Aguirre remains in the psyche of the city attorney’s office. We have now seen two city attorneys elected since then promising that they would never do that. She is running for the District 3 seat on the County Board of Supervisors, and that will be a race we and everyone else who cares about the county will follow intensely. Civic San Diego Lawsuit Resolution? The City Council is getting briefed in closed session Tuesday on the state of two lawsuits that have challenged the legality of the city’s downtown redevelopment agency. The first lawsuit, and the one we’ve had our eye on for years, was filed by Murtaza Baxamusa, a former board member at Civic. We don’t know what the city’s attorneys plan to tell the City Council in closed session Tuesday about the suit, but a settlement has been looming for months. – Cory Briggs has filed his own lawsuit against Civic, again over the legality of the city delegating some planning responsibility to the agency. The lawsuit is over a year old, but somehow we hadn’t previously known – and it doesn’t look like anyone else has yet reported – that Briggs was also involved in the legal challenge to Civic. What’s at stake: Backing up a bit, a major settlement could fundamentally change Civic’s role in city development.

Politics Report: The Lure No City Attorney Can Avoid Anymore

Eleven years since he lost re-election, former San Diego City Attorney Mike Aguirre remains in the psyche of the city attorney’s office. We have now seen two city attorneys elected since then promising that they would never do that. She is running for the District 3 seat on the County Board of Supervisors, and that will be a race we and everyone else who cares about the county will follow intensely. Civic San Diego Lawsuit Resolution? The City Council is getting briefed in closed session Tuesday on the state of two lawsuits that have challenged the legality of the city’s downtown redevelopment agency. The first lawsuit, and the one we’ve had our eye on for years, was filed by Murtaza Baxamusa, a former board member at Civic. We don’t know what the city’s attorneys plan to tell the City Council in closed session Tuesday about the suit, but a settlement has been looming for months. – Cory Briggs has filed his own lawsuit against Civic, again over the legality of the city delegating some planning responsibility to the agency. The lawsuit is over a year old, but somehow we hadn’t previously known – and it doesn’t look like anyone else has yet reported – that Briggs was also involved in the legal challenge to Civic. What’s at stake: Backing up a bit, a major settlement could fundamentally change Civic’s role in city development.

How Philly’s electricians union and Johnny Doc converted payroll deductions into political influence

For years before he was indicted last month, Electricians union leader John J. Week after week, small-dollar donations withdrawn from the paychecks of members of Local 98 of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers piled up in the bank account of the union’s main political action committee, Committee on Political Education, or COPE. From 2002 through 2018, the union collected just under $41 million to invest in helping elect allies to local, state, and national offices, according to an Inquirer analysis of Local 98 member contributions to the political committee. Under the leadership of John Dougherty, Local 98 of the electrician’s union has collected millions from its members through payroll deductions, using the funds to help elect allies to local, state, and federal offices. Annual contributions to Local 98 from its members SOURCE: Analysis of Pa. campaign-finance reports Staff Graphic The 159-page indictment returned by a federal grand jury entangled only one elected official — Councilman Bobby Henon — and didn’t charge anyone with making or receiving improper campaign donations. Perhaps the crowning moment came in 2015, when union money helped Democrats take control of the state Supreme Court by electing three justices, including Dougherty’s brother, Kevin, whose campaign got $1.5 million. After the indictments, it’s possible that Local 98 will keep spreading political money around as Philadelphia holds elections for mayor and City Council this year. The money comes from union members. Dougherty took control of Local 98 in 1993 and made his first political move two years later, helping electrician-turned-politician Rick Mariano unseat City Councilman Dan McElhatton in the 1995 Democratic primary. Mariano, who spent five years in federal prison and emerged a critic of Dougherty’s and the union’s leadership, compared the members’ payroll deductions to what is known as “macing,” when political bosses require public employees to donate to the party.

Former city councillor Paul Borrelli hoping to enter federal politics

Borrelli, who lost his Ward 10 seat in last year’s municipal election after one term, said he is seeking a nomination to become the Liberal candidate in Windsor West. That’s essentially it in a nutshell. “Unless you have representation at the governing table, you don’t really have a voice. Story continues below “As of right now, there are no candidates green-lit in Windsor West,” he said. “A nomination process has not started.” Sartori said he didn’t know when the process will begin. “The determination of the time of the nomination contest is up to the central party,” said Sartori. “Certainly, we have input. Borrelli, a former financial agent for the Conservative party, is the first person to publicly state an intention to run as a Liberal in Windsor West. “I’ve been a Liberal all my life but I did basically look at the Conservatives for a while,” said Borrelli. “If I do become a candidate, I will try my best to change Windsor and make sure Windsor is a place that will be recognized in the future,” said Borrelli.

Chattanooga politicians react to record number of women running for president in 2020

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — A record-breaking number of women plan to run for president in 2020. Democratic Senator Kamala Harris of California made her formal announcement on Good Morning America Monday. Councilwoman Carol Berz says she thinks the current political and social environments have sparked women's interest in public office. Movements, like The Women's March, continue to dominate the headlines, but Berz says it takes more than marching to make women to run. Serving on Chattanooga's City Council for more than a decade, Berz says she understands why more women now are answering the call to public service. "I think its economy of scale, I think it's equity in business, I think it's education - I think it’s all sorts of things. I think the thing we need to realize is these aren't Republican or Democratic issues. Those who were some the first to see women step into our community's leadership roles, like Marie Hurley Blair, daughter of Mai Bell Hurley, Chattanooga's first female elected to city government, say the key to success as a woman in politics is standing your ground. "She had self-doubt at times, but I think she really was very much a big fixer person and had such a strong belief in the potential of what Chattanooga could become and was a part of that at every step,” said Blair. Councilwoman Berz expects, if the momentum continues, even more women will sit in the commission chambers and even in the Oval Office.

Politics plays a role in Toronto city council ‘class photo’ — but so does...

Councillor John Filion arrived running and breathless; Cynthia Lai wore fuchsia and Shelley Carroll will have to be photoshopped into Toronto’s official city council photo for 2018-2022. The veteran councillor said it was his eighth official city council photo, including his service on North York council. This year, as last term, Minnan-Wong was seated in the front row, directly on Mayor John Tory’s right. Rabble rouser Gord Perks (Ward 4, Parkdale High-Park) was consigned to the back row, third from the left, a corner far from Tory, with whom he often clashes. A seating plan is devised ahead of time, but it usually gets switched around in the last minutes, depending on height and what people are wearing, said Bev Kurmey, Toronto’s senior project manager in strategic protocol and external relations. Lista was himself relaxed — he has worked with this group before — he took council’s picture last time. He took Nunziata’s picture when she was mayor of York. Filion arrived on the run, to slow clapping from his peers, taking a place on the far left side of the top row. Three of the councillors in the 2014-2018 picture died during the term, including former mayor Rob Ford, who ran as a councillor after ill health forced him to abandon his effort to seek a second term as mayor. More change is on the way — Toronto has been treading water on important issues like transit for too long, critics say, and it’s time to get on with the business of building the city to better serve residents.