Wednesday, June 26, 2019
Northam Strikes Back: Gillespie attack Ads are ‘despicable’ | Fear Mongering - Ralph Northam TV Advideo

Northam Strikes Back: Gillespie attack Ads are ‘despicable’ | Fear Mongering – Ralph Northam...

The Washington Post: Virginia Democrat Ralph Northam is airing a new statewide commercial in the final days of the governor’s race in which he calls negative ads from his Republican opponent “despicable.” After weeks of advertising from Republican Ed Gillespie…

‘Snap’ Election in Japan Pays Off for Abe

The Story: Japan's voters, in an election held Sunday, October 22, gave Prime Minister Shinzo Abe a great boost in his position in parliament. The Specifics: Abe...
Virginia Governor Race: Restore | Ralph Northam (D) TV Advideo

Virginia Governor Race: Restore | Ralph Northam (D) TV Ad

The Virginia gubernatorial election of 2017 will take place on November 7, 2017. The incumbent governor, Democrat Terry McAuliffe, is not eligible to run for re-election due to term limits. Virginia is the only state that prohibits its governor from serving consecutive terms. The Democratic Party nominated Ralph Northam and the Republican…
Virginia Governor Race: Restore | Ralph Northam (D) TV Advideo

Virginia Governor Race: Restore | Ralph Northam (D) TV Ad

The Virginia gubernatorial election of 2017 will take place on November 7, 2017. The incumbent governor, Democrat Terry McAuliffe, is not eligible to run for re-election due to term limits. Virginia is the only state that prohibits its governor from serving consecutive terms. The Democratic Party nominated Ralph Northam and the Republican…

John McCain Praises Sen. Jeff Flake After He Announces His Retirement

Sen. John McCain praised Jeff Flake, his fellow Republican Senator from Arizona, after he announced that he would not seek re-election in the coming midterms. "It's been one of the great honors of my life to have the opportunity to serve with a man of integrity, and honor, and decency, and commitment to not only Arizona, but the United States of America," McCain said of the 54-year-old senator on Tuesday. "I have seen Jeff Flake stand up for what he believes in, knowing full well there would be a political price to pay," McCain added. Flake has been a vocal critic of President Donald Trump despite their shared party. Recent polls conducted by both Republican and Democratic groups in Arizona show Flake is at risk of badly losing the state's primary next August, according to CNN. "If I have been critical, it's not because I relish criticizing the behavior of the President of the United States," Flake said during his retirement speech on the Senate floor Tuesday. "If I have been critical, it is because I believe that it is my obligation to do so, as a matter of duty and conscience. "The notion that one should stay silent as the norms and values that keep America strong are undermined and as the alliances and agreements that ensure the stability of the entire world are routinely threatened by the level of thought that goes into 140 characters — the notion that one should say and do nothing in the face of such mercurial behavior is ahistoric and, I believe, profoundly misguided," Flake added. Flake joins Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, another outspoken Republican critic of Trump who won't seek re-election in 2018.

Jeff Flake, a Fierce Trump Critic, Will Not Seek Re-Election for Senate

WASHINGTON — Senator Jeff Flake, the Arizona Republican who has tangled with President Trump for months, announced on Tuesday that he would not seek re-election in 2018, declaring on the Senate floor that he “will no longer be complicit or silent” in the face of the president’s “reckless, outrageous and undignified” behavior. Mr. Flake made his announcement in an extraordinary 17-minute speech in which he challenged not only the president but also his party’s leadership. The announcement appeared to signal a moment of decision for the Republican Party. Former President George W. Bush, in yet another speech, lamented: “We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism.” On Tuesday morning, Mr. Trump had renewed his attacks on another critic in the Republican Party, Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee, saying he “couldn’t get elected dog catcher in Tennessee.” Mr. Corker, appearing more weary than angry, said the president “is debasing our country.” But Mr. Flake, choosing the Senate floor for his fierce denunciation of the president, appeared to issue a direct challenge to his colleagues and his party. It is dangerous to a democracy.” As he spoke, Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, Mr. McCain and Mr. Corker sat listening on the Senate floor. The announcement did please Republican officials in Arizona and Washington, who believe that they now have a better chance at retaining the seat. Few in the Senate had spoken more candidly about their misgivings with Mr. Trump, first as a candidate and then as president. Mr. Flake’s decision to step down was, in a sense, a tacit admission that crossing the president had put him in political peril. “We’re not here to simply mark time,” the senator said. “Sustained incumbency is certainly not the point of seeking office, and there are times when we must risk our careers in favor of our principles.

The Politics Of Tax Reform: 101

Tax reform is not a top priority for most Americans, which might make it less divisive than health care. The various Republican health care bills that Congress considered were all unpopular. In the same survey, 37 percent said health care was their top voting issue. The bill might therefore disproportionately benefit those groups, which would likely make it really unpopular. In a June Gallup survey, for example, 55 percent of Americans said the Democratic Party would do a better job dealing with health care, compared with just 36 percent who said Republicans would. Well, except if that plan benefits mostly the rich. 4: Tax cuts for the wealthy are unpopular; tax cuts for the less well-off are very popular. In an October YouGov survey, 51 percent of Americans favored cutting taxes for all Americans, with only 29 percent opposed. According to the aforementioned October YouGov poll, only 48 percent of Trump’s own voters would favor a tax cut if it increased the deficit. But tax cuts are probably a higher priority for voters than deficit reduction.

Guess Who Ivana Trump Voted for in 2016? (Exclusive Interview with Ivana Trump)

In a special exclusive author interview with Ivana Trump, she reveals who she voted for in the 2016 presidential election, the charming story of how she and Donald Trump met, and the life lessons she instilled in the First Children – Donald Jr., Eric, and Ivanka Trump. She is the author of the new book, Raising Trump, which is already a national bestseller. Ivana Trump is a Czech-born American businesswoman, author, fashion designer, socialite, and former fashion model. She is the former Vice President of Interior Design for the Trump Organization, where she supervised construction and design of Trump Tower, Trump Plaza Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, and The Grand Hyatt Hotel. Under her leadership, the Plaza Hotel was recognized as the “Best Luxury Hotel in the United States.” She continues to produce products, fragrances, and accessories under Ivana Haute Couture. Her pride and joy though are, of course, her three children. In her new book, Raising Trump, Ivana Trump, or as she calls herself – “The Lion Mom,” reflects on her extraordinary life and the raising of her three children—and recounts the lessons she taught them as they were growing up. As her former husband takes his place as the 45th President of the United States, his children have also been thrust into the media spotlight—but it is Ivana who raised them and proudly instilled in them what she believes to be the most important life lessons. Learn which lessons she instilled in them in our exclusive author interview below with Ivana Trump!

The Resistance Now: Democrats divided over party shakeup

But instead progressives have been angered by Perez’s shake-up of party leaders, which has ousted several of those on the left. Zogby has been booted off the committee, NBC News reported, as has the former DNC secretary Alice Germond – who also supported Ellison. At the same time, Perez plans to install a number of lobbyists and former Clinton allies as DNC “members-at-large”, according to Bloomberg. In the process, Handler will be making a documentary raising the profile of people from different ethnic and political backgrounds. The effort comes as the supreme court prepares to hear the case of Jack Phillips, a Denver-based baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex wedding based on his religious objections to gay marriage. It takes from those in need and gives to those who are already living in incredible opulence”.

‘You Cannot Complain If You Didn’t Vote’: Barack Obama Returns to the Campaign Trail

The former President took the stage Thursday for his first campaign event since leaving office, a canvas kickoff for Phil Murphy, the Democratic candidate for Governor of New Jersey, and Sheila Oliver, who is running as his lieutenant Governor, in Newark Thursday. Obama did not address President Donald Trump's false accusation that his predecessor failed to call any Gold Star families during his time in the White House; he did not mention President Trump or any member of Congress by name. He did however, disavow political divisiveness and deride what he coined backward looking policies. "Some of the politics we see now we thought we’d put that to bed. Thats folks looking 50 years back," he told a cheering crowd at the invite-only event. "It's the 21st century not the 19th century." He also noted his administration's accomplishments, touting the thousands of jobs created during his tenure, and the people who became insured under the Affordable Care Act. But Obama's remarks largely centered on the importance of electing Democrats to the Governorship in New Jersey, and how voting is the most effective way of channeling inevitable dissatisfaction some may feel during the Trump era. "You cannot complain if you didn't vote; you did not exercise the power the constitution gives us that people fought for," Obama said. "It’s in no one’s interest – including the former President’s, the Democratic Party’s, or the country’s – for President Obama to become the face of any resistance or the party.